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Курсовик THE HISTORY OF CORNWELL

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Тип работы: Курсовик. Предмет: Ин. языки. Добавлен: 05.10.2011. Сдан: 2010. Страниц: 33. Уникальность по antiplagiat.ru: 97.

Описание (план):


НЕГОСУДАРСТВЕННОЕ ОБРАЗОВАТЕЛЬНОЕ УЧРЕЖДЕНИЕ
ВЫСШЕГО ПРОФЕССИОНАЛЬНОГО ОБРАЗОВАНИЯ
«УНИВЕРСИТЕТ РОССИЙСКОЙ АКАДЕМИИ ОБРАЗОВАНИЯ»
Челябинский филиал
Гуманитарный факультет
КАФЕДРА ИНОСТРАННЫХ ЯЗЫКОВ


КУРСОВАЯ РАБОТА НА ТЕМУ
THE HISTORY OF CORNWELL


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Проверил:


Челябинск, 2010



CONTENTS


INTORDUCTION………………………………………………..…3
PART 1. OVERWIEV OF THE BRITISH PREHISTORY

1.1. THE PERIODS OF PREHISTORIC BRITAIN…………………...5
1.2. THE HISTORY OF CELTS……………………………………….14
1.3. KING ARTHUR…………………………………………………...16
CONCLUSION OF THE PART 1................................................20
PART 2. THE HISORY OF CORNWALL
1.4. PREHISTORY OF CORNWALL………………………………...21
1.5. CORNISH LANGUAGE…………………………………………..24
1.6. CORNISH LITERATURE AND FOLKLORE…………...……....26
1.7. RELIGION…………………………………………………………28
1.8. CORNISH ART……………………………………………………29
CONCLUSION OF THE PART2.................................................30
CONCLUSION……………………………………………………..31
SOURCES…………………………………………………………..32











INTRODUCTION

Cornwall s a ceremonial county and unitary authority of England, United Kingdom, forming the tip of the south-western peninsula of Great Britain. It is bordered to the north and west by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar.
Including the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall has a population of 534,300, and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). The administrative centre and only city is Truro.
The area now known as Cornwall was first inhabited in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods. It continued to be occupied by Neolithic and then Bronze Age peoples, and later (in the Iron Age) by Celts.
There is little evidence that Roman rule was effective west of Exeter and few Roman remains have been found. Cornwall was a division of the Dumnonii tribe—whose tribal centre was in the modern county of Devon—known as the Cornovii, separated from Wales after the Battle of Deorham, often coming into conflict with the expanding English kingdom of Wessex before King Athelstan in AD 936 set the boundary between English and Cornish people at the Tamar.
Historically tin mining was important in the Cornish economy, becoming significant during the Middle Ages and expanding greatly during the 19th century when rich copper mines were also in production.
In the mid-nineteenth century, however, the tin and copper trades entered a period of decline. Subsequently china clay extraction became more important and metal mining had virtually ended by the 1990s.
Traditionally fishing (particularly of pilchards), and agriculture (particularly of dairy products and vegetables), were the other important sectors of the economy. The railways led to the growth of tourism during the 20th century and it is now of greater importance economically than the other industries.
Today, Cornwalls economy struggles after the decline of the mining and fishing industries, and has become more dependent on tourism. The area is noted for its wild moorland landscapes, its extensive and varied coastline, its many place names derived from the Cornish language, and its very mild climate.
Cornwall is recognised as one of the Celtic nations by many Cornish people, residents and organisationsIt retains a distinct cultural identity, reflecting its history, and modern use of the revived Cornish language has increased. Some people question the present constitutional status of Cornwall, and a nationalist movement seeks greater autonomy within the United Kingdom in the form of a devolved legislative assembly, and greater recognition of the Cornish people as a national minority.


















PART 1. OVERWEIV OF THE PREHISTORIC BRITAIN

1.1. THE PERIODS OF PREHISTORIC BRITAIN

Prehistoric Britain is the period between the arrival of the first humans in Great Britain and the start of recorded British history. The period prior to occupation by the genus Homo is part of the Geology of the British Isles. The history of Britain is conventionally reckoned to begin in AD 43 with the Roman invasion of Britain, though some historical information is available from before this.
Prehistory is commonly divided chronologically into distinct periods, based on the development of tools from stone to bronze and iron as well as changes in culture and climate, but their boundaries are uncertain, and the changes between them gradual; the dates of the changes are generally different from those of continental Europe.
Britain has been intermittently inhabited by members of the Homo genus for hundreds of thousands of years and by Homo sapiens for tens of thousands of years. DNA analysis has shown that modern humans arrived in Britain before the last ice age but retreated to Southern Europe when much of Britain was ice covered, with the remainder being tundra.
At this time the sea level was about 127 m (417 ft.) lower than it is today, so Britain was joined to Ireland and by the area known as Doggerland to the continent of Europe. After the end of the last Ice Age (around 9500 BC), Ireland became separated from Britain; later (around 6500 BC), Britain was cut off from the rest of Europe...

..............................................


SOURCES

1. Baker, Margaret. Folklore and customs of rural England. Newton Abbot, David & Charles, 1974.
2. Bere, Rennie (1982) The Nature of Cornwall. Buckingham: Barracuda Books
3. Brown, H. Miles (1976) A Century for Cornwall. Truro: Blackford
4. Bryant, Arthur. A history of Britain and the British people. London, Collins, 1990.
5. Charles-Edwards, T. (1970) "The Seven Bishop Houses of Dyfed," In: Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies, vol. 24, (1970-1972), pp. 247-252.
6. Clark, George. English history: A survey. London, Oxford univ. Press, 1971.
7. Doble, G. H. (1990) The Saints of Cornwall. 5 vols. Truro: Dean and Chapter, 1960-70
8. Fitzgibbon, Theodora (1972) A Taste of England: the West Country. London: J. M.
9. Halliday, F. E. (1999) A History of Cornwall, London: Duckworth, ISBN 1-84232-123-4, p. 51.
10. Hogg, Garry. Customs and traditions of England. Newton Abbot, David & Charles, 1971.
11. Hole, Christina. English traditional customs. London - Sydney, Batsford, 1975.
12. Keynes, Simon; Lapidge, Michael (tr.) (1983), Alfred the Great: Assers Life of King Alfred and other contemporary sources, London, Penguin Books, p. 175; cf. ibid, p. 89
13. Mason, Laura; Brown, Catherine (1999) From Bath Chaps to Bara Brith. Totnes: Prospect Books
14. Michael Swanton, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, 2nd ed. London, Phoenix Press, 2000, p. 177
15. Pettigrew, Jane (2004) Afternoon Tea. Andover: Jarrold
16. Price, J. H., Hepton, C. E. L. and Honey, S. I. (1979). The Inshore Benthic Biota of the Lizard Peninsula, south west Cornwall: the marine algae -- History; Chlorophyta; Phaeophyta. Cornish Studies; no. 7: pp. 7-37
17. Rabley, Stephen. Customs and traditions in Britain. Harlow (Essex), Longman, 1989.
18. Stenton, F. M. (1997) Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Clarendon Press; p. 337
19. Todd, Michael (1987) The South West to AD 1000. London : Longman
20. Williams, Ann & Martin, G. H. (2002) (tr.) Domesday Book: a complete translation, London: Penguin, pp. 341-357
21. Гуревич А.Я., Харитонов Д.Э. История средних веков. Учебник. М., 1995.
22. История средних веков. В 2х томах. Учебник для вузов/ Под редакцией Удальцовой З.В. и Карпова С.П. М., 1990

INTERNET SOURCES

1. news.bbc.co.uk/local/cornwall/hi/
2. cornwalls.co.uk/
3. visitcornwall.com/
4. cornwall.com/



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